Quick Answer: What Is A Credit Card Balance Transfer?

Is it worth it to transfer a balance?

But in general, a balance transfer is the most valuable choice if you need months to pay off high-interest debt and have good enough credit to qualify for a card with a 0% introductory APR on balance transfers. Such a card could save you plenty on interest, giving you an edge when paying off your balances.

What is a balance transfer and how does it work?

How Do Balance Transfers Work? The goal of a balance transfer is to save money on interest while you pay off credit card debt. You can move a credit card balance to a new card, but typically, you’re not allowed to transfer a balance from one card to another that’s issued by the same company or any of its affiliates.

What’s the catch with balance transfers?

But there’s a catch: If you transfer a balance and are still carrying a balance when the 0% intro APR period ends, you will have to start paying interest on the remaining balance. If you want to avoid this, make a plan to pay off your credit card balance during the no-interest intro period.

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What is the benefit of doing a balance transfer?

Transferring your balance means moving all or part of a debt from one credit card to another. People often use them to take advantage of lower – sometimes 0% – interest rates. Switching to a card with a lower interest rate lets you: pay less interest on what you currently owe (but you’ll usually pay a fee)

Does a balance transfer count as a payment?

Yes, balance transfers work just like a monthly payment to your credit card company. The credit card company you’re transferring from only knows you made a payment — it doesn’t know if it’s a transfer or not. That said, a balance transfer doesn’t process exactly like a minimum payment you’d make online.

Is it smart to pay off one credit card with another?

Key takeaways. When you’re transferring a balance, you can use one credit card to pay off another. You can’t pay direct monthly payments for one card with another card. It’s possible to take out a cash advance on one credit card to pay off another, but it’s not a good idea.

Can I still use my credit card after balance transfer?

When your balance transfer is complete, your old card isn’t automatically closed, and you’re not required to cancel it either. Depending on the new card’s credit limit, you may not be able to transfer the entire balance. In that case, the old card will have a remaining balance you must continue to pay off.

What happens if you don’t pay off a balance transfer?

Once the 0% balance transfer ends, the regular balance transfer interest rate will go into effect on the unpaid portion of the balance transfer. You’ll continue to be charged interest each month until the balance is paid off.

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Do you have to pay back interest on balance transfers?

Keep an eye out for language like this buried in terms and conditions: “ There is no grace period on your balance transfers. If you take advantage of this balance transfer offer, you will be charged interest on purchases unless your purchase APR is at a promotional 0% APR,” Discover writes for one of its cards.

What is best way to pay off credit card debt?

Ways to pay off credit card debt

  1. Pay the most expensive balance first. If you want to get out of debt as quickly as possible, list your debts from the highest interest rate to the lowest.
  2. The “snowball” method.
  3. Consider a balance transfer credit card.
  4. Get your spending under control.
  5. Grow your emergency fund.
  6. Switch to cash.

How long does a balance transfer take?

A credit card balance transfer typically takes about five to seven days, but some major card issuers ask customers to allow up to 14 or even 21 days to complete the transaction.

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